Water Protectors Target DAPL Builder's Profits to "Sink This Sucker"

Water protectors in North Dakota are launching the next phase of resistance against the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL)—hurting its parent company’s profits.

After securing a crucial victory earlier this year that halted construction on the 1,172-mile oil pipeline that opponents say threatens Indigenous rights and access to clean water, activists are now strategizing how to deplete Energy Transfer Partner’s (ETP) financials before the incoming Trump administration can undo progress against the pipeline, the Guardian reported Thursday.

“We are preparing because we know we have a fight on our hands. We will be standing our ground no matter what,” said LaDonna Brave Bull Allard, a Standing Rock Sioux tribe member.

ETP pledged to investors to have DAPL operational by early 2017. In court documents filed in November, the company indicated it was “committed to complete, test, and have DAPL in service” by a January 1 deadline—which, if it failed to meet, meant shipping partners would be allowed to terminate their commitments.

Opponents hope stalling the project could hurt ETP’s bottom line enough to cancel the pipeline’s construction.

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